• GET NEW POSTS HERE

    Enter your email address:

Audubon Zoo, New Orleans

 

The Audubon Zoo in New Orleans is ranked as one of the top zoos in the United States. We didn’t know this at all at the time.

 

In fact we had no idea how amazing it would be when we decided to take a break from Mardi Gras in Nawlins’, which of course, was fantastic fun, and in fact, when T suggested going to the zoo, I almost poo-pooed it. Who wants to go to a zoo when they’re in the middle of a place known for its fantastic music and parades and food? Now I am so glad we went!

P1100612

P1100612

The Audubon Park

 

The Audubon Park was originally a Sugar Plantation owned by Etienne de Bore, the pioneer of granulated sugar. Besides the world-class zoo, it also has a 2 mile track, a golf course, a swimming pool, a tennis court, horse stables, a picnic area and lagoons throughout the park. There is also an Aquarium and an Insectarium.

 

There are over 1500 animals in the zoo, each in a carefully created natural habitat. A train leaves from the Louisiana Swamp area every 30 minutes and you can also do the Safari Simulator Ride.

 

P1100615

P1100615

 

The Audubon Zoo felt quite ordinary at first. There were the bright pink-orange flamingos, and birds.

P1100614

P1100614

P1100630

P1100630

The Elephants

 

But, oh… there were Asian elephants! We love elephants.

P1100616

P1100616

P1100619

P1100619

P1100620

P1100620

 

We could get so close to them too.

P1100621

P1100621

 

The Bear

 

WHOA! This bronze bear paw would catch anyone’s attention!

P1100639

P1100639

P1100640

P1100640

 

But the big bad Sun Bear with the wild hooked claws looked anything but menacing as he was having a teddy-bear snooze in the tree. 

P1100643

P1100643

 

The Croc

 

WHAT?! OMG! This was an open pond, and we were only a few feet away! 

P1100644

P1100644

Oh, it’s fake… just a sculpture.

Still… scary as anything.

 

Snakes and Snails and Puppy Dog Tails

Snakes. Yikes! Not my thing, but T was keen to see this woman play with the snake and talk about it for 20 long minutes… OK, 10 minutes – but 10 minutes too long.

P1100647

P1100647

 

Same thing with the big bird.

P1100652

P1100652

 

There were some funny-looking turtles with lego-bump shells.

P1100649

P1100649

 

This was kind of weird seeing hundreds of birds with other strange animals, Nutria (large swamp rodents), together in the bog.

P1100655

P1100655

P1100658

P1100658

 

The Jaguar Brothers

 

You could come nose to nose with these two jaguars! Honestly. Not kidding. Not exaggerating.

 

Nothing was between us and those two jaguars except a glass wall, a clear glass wall! We presumed it was super-strong, and in seconds we were entertained beyond our wildest dreams.  

P1100662

P1100662

 

So cute, like a big kitten.

P1100663

P1100663

 

OR MAYBE NOT!  (Taking two steps back very quickly!)

P1100666P1100666

 

Then, just like two young brothers, the jaguars began to wrestle.

P1100660

P1100660

 

And snarl… and growl… and bite.

P1100661

P1100661

P1100667

P1100667

P1100674

P1100674

 

It was some serious stuff they were sorting out! On second thought, they look more like husband and wife!

P1100676

P1100676

 

And then it was over and they were back to kittens again, licking their paws.

P1100679

P1100679

P1100681

P1100681

P1100682

P1100682

 

The Primates: Monkeys

P1100762

P1100762

 

As they always are, the monkeys were lively and entertaining, and we hung on to our cameras.

P1100684

P1100684

P1100685

P1100685

P1100686

P1100686

P1100687

P1100687

P1100688

P1100688

 

This monkey was on a mission. He was going to climb the pole overlooking the pond.

P1100689

P1100689

P1100691

P1100691

 

We dubbed this little guy “The Thinker”, as he sat on top of the pole in serious introspection.

P1100692

P1100692

 

And this little monkey, at the bottom of the pole, we labelled “The Crier”. It looked like the turtles, sitting on a log below him, were in sympathy, some were even asking what was wrong.

P1100693 Closer

P1100693 Closer

 

One Animal – or Two?

 

This almost looks like one animal, but on second glance it appears to be two, an anteater and we’re not sure what the other animal is. They must have been buddies because it was like they were joined at the hip.

P1100695 Closer

P1100695 Closer

P1100696

P1100696

 

Hurricane Katrina

 

Hurricane Katrina damaged a lot of the Zoo’s trees and foliage. These bamboo branches were left leaning, but newer sprouts grow in straight.

P1100698

P1100698

P1100699

P1100699

P1100700

P1100700

P1100701

P1100701

P1100749

P1100749

The Giraffes

 

The giraffes are always fun to watch with their gangly legs and long necks. It’s even awkward for them to get up.

P1100703

P1100703

P1100706

P1100706

P1100708

P1100708

P1100709

P1100709

 

A Three-Headed Giraffe?

P1100712

P1100712

 

The Louisiana Swamp

 

The Louisiana Swamp was totally engrosing with its authentic Bayou setting and all of the alligators. There are rare white alligators in the swamp (which we did not see),  and an alligator-feeding time (which we missed).

P1100747

P1100747

P1100720

P1100720

 

Can you spot the alligators?

P1100721

P1100721

P1100722

P1100722

P1100726

P1100726

 

Fooling around with artsy shots… tree shadows against the green slime of the swamp.

P1100729

P1100729

 

Can you imagine living here? A typical house on the swamp. But… what… is… that… in the… water….??? A log…? or…

P1100731

P1100731

P1100732

P1100732

P1100734

P1100734

P1100735

P1100735

 

It’s hard to tell the real alligators from the fake. This one is fake, but the above ones were real!

P1100736

P1100736

P1100760

 

Oh, a raccoon in a tree. Can they climb trees? I guess I would too, if an alligator was lurking underneath me.

P1100727

P1100727

 

Continuing on in the Louisiana Swamp area, there is a typical old Bayou grocery store.

P1100740

P1100740

P1100742

P1100742

P1100743

P1100743

P1100744

P1100744

P1100745

P1100745

 

But what is this behind the store? It is alive. It looks like a Maine Coon Cat, but the orange ears and the funny short tail tells us it is something else. Anyone know?

P1100746

 

Back to the regular part of the zoo… zebras, huge rhinos, seals…

P1100750

P1100750

P1100754

P1100754

 

Gigantic tree with TWO roots.

P1100755

P1100755

P1100756

P1100756

P1100759

 

Now this is the type of creative posters we’d like to see in all zoos, not just in the Audubon Zoo. Rather than a boring list of facts about an animal, this type of poster draws your attention, gives you a little chuckle, and you will never forget what seals and sea lions eat, now will you!

P1100758

P1100758

 

World of Primates – Gorillas and Orangutan

 

Our favorite exhibits at the Audubon Zoo were hands-down the Gorillas and the Orangutan.

P1100762

P1100762

 

Many unusual species of monkeys.

P1100766

P1100766

P1100771

P1100771

 

But we were completely mesmerized watching the African Gorillas. Their gestures, movements, attitudes and looks were amazingly human-like. We are certain that we have evolved from apes. How could it be otherwise? At first they turned their backs to us, as if to say,

“We don’t like being stared at, you idiot humans!”

P1100777

P1100777

P1100778

P1100778

P1100782P1100782

P1100783

P1100783

 

Then this guy seemed to be thinking,

“Ah, let them look and stare – I don’t care. I have to clean my toes.”

P1100779

P1100779

P1100780

P1100780

P1100792

P1100792

 

If looks could kill, we would be dead!

P1100793

P1100793

P1100794

P1100794

 

These gorillas were quite aggressive, as most gorillas are, and it seemed clear to us that they simply did not like us watching them and taking photos. When a few more people came to see the gorillas, they displayed attitudes like this! What do you think he is saying to himself?

P1100795

P1100795

P1100798 Close Up

P1100798 Close Up

P1100798

P1100798

 

This was Grumpy Old Gorilla, sitting and contemplating life in a back corner.

P1100784 Close Up

P1100784 Close Up

P1100784 Closer

P1100784 Closer

P1100784

P1100784

 

When he realized that we were watching him and taking pictures, he grunted as if annoyed, and moved.

P1100785

P1100785

P1100786

P1100786

P1100787

P1100787

Then Grumpy Old Gorilla stopped to give us a dirty look.

P1100788P1100788

P1100788 Closer

P1100788 Closer

P1100789 Closer

P1100789 Closer

 

As a parting gesture, he turned and farted in our face.

P1100799100799

 

We took the hint and decided to move along before these gorillas decided to take further action.

 

 

The Orangutan was much more accommodating, open, and curious. When we first came, he looked very comfortable relaxing in his lower hammock, and maybe a touch bored.

P1100774

P1100774

P1100775 Close Up

P1100775 Close Up

P1100775

P1100775

 

When he saw us, he climbed down from the hammock to check us out. Just look at all that hair! 

P1100776

P1100800 Closer

P1100800 Closer

P1100800

P1100800

 

Then all of a sudden he came ambling toward us. We took a few steps back even though there was a barrier below.

P1100801P1100801

P1100801 Closer

P1100801 Closer

 

He looked straight at us and reached out palm upwards. 

P1100804P1100804

P1100804 Closer

P1100804 Closer

 

When we didn’t respond with food or a treat of any kind, not even a piece of paper which he seemed to be fond of since it was strewn all over his yard, he seemed to sit back and contemplate the situation. Perhaps he was reflecting on how he might get through to these fools staring at him.

P1100805

P1100805 Closer

P1100805 Closer

P1100808 Closer

P1100808 Closer

P1100808

P1100808

He turned away briefly.

P1100803P1100803

 

Then he turned back toward us and tried again… hand outstretched. Maybe he was asking for help. Maybe he was inviting us to come in and join him. He was all alone after all.

P1100807P1100807

He stayed that way for a long time, like he thought maybe these dumb people would eventually catch on, but we had no food to give him, nor were we probably supposed to feed any animal at the zoo, and we certainly were not going in to see him though he seemed friendly enough.

P1100806

P1100806

So cute! And sad too, to see any animal caged for our benefit.

P1100806 Closer

P1100806 Closer

 

Finally, he sighed and gave up, and we watched as a furry ball of hair clamor back up into his hammock. 

P1100810

P1100810

P1100811P1100811

 

He leaned forward and gave us one final look, as if to say,

“Nice seeing you. Goodbye.”

P1100811 Closer

P1100811 Closer

 

The Audubon Zoo

It was worth going to the zoo just to see the human-like Grumpy Old Gorilla and the Young Orangutan. I don’t think I will ever forget the contemptuous looks from the gorillas or the begging eyes of the sweet orangutan with his beckoning hand stretched eagerly toward us. 

 

To get there, take the St. Charles Ave Streetcar to the Audubon Zoo, 6500 Magazine St. Prices: about $20 for the zoo or a combination ticket for the zoo, Aquarium, and Insectarium about $35. Open Tuesday to Sunday 10-5. For more information go to:  www.auduboninstitute.org

 

icon-car.pngKML-LogoFullscreen-LogoQR-code-logoGeoJSON-LogoGeoRSS-LogoWikitude-Logo
New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S.

loading map - please wait...

New Orleans, Louisiana, U.S. 30.183122, -90.065918
Share
Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Audubon Zoo, New Orleans

  1. Wendy says:

    Awesome pictures! If I ever get there, I will be sure to visit!

  2. Thanks Wendy. It was the best zoo I have ever visited. They say the San Diego Zoo is even better though.

  3. Janice Marriott says:

    I really enjoyed this. Thanks for taking us along.

We love comments! Any thoughts on this post?

  • Get New Posts Here

    Enter your email address: